U.S. Department of Transportation
Federal Highway Administration
1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE
Washington, DC 20590
202-366-4000


Skip to content U.S. Department of Transportation/Federal Highway AdministrationU.S. Department of Transportation/Federal Highway Administration

Safety

eSubscribe
eSubscribe Envelope

FHWA Home / Safety / Intersection / Low-Cost Safety Enhancements for Stop-Controlled and Signalized Intersections

Low-Cost Safety Enhancements for Stop-Controlled and Signalized Intersections

FHWA Office of Safety logo: Safer Roads for a Safer Future – Investment in safer roads saves lives.

Download Version
PDF [905 KB]

Office of Safety
Federal Highway Administration

May 2009

  Table of Contents Next >

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction

  2. Stop-Controlled Intersections

  3. Signalized Intersections

  4. Lighting at Unlit or Poorly Lit Intersections

  5. High-Frictions Surfaces

  6. Speed Reduction Countermeasures on High Speed Approaches to Intersections

  7. Multiple Countermeasures Applied at the Same Intersection

  8. The Systematic Approach – Concept

  9. Systematic Deployment – The Process

  10. Summary

List of Tables

Table 1: Crash Reduction Factors, Typical Crash Thresholds, Additional Application Factors, and Estimated Implementation Cost Ranges for Countermeasures at Stop-Controlled Intersections

Table 2: Crash Reduction Factors, Typical Crash Thresholds, Additional Application Factors, and Estimated Implementation Cost Ranges for Countermeasures at J-Turn Stop-Controlled Intersections

Table 3: Crash Reduction Factors, Typical Crash Thresholds, Additional Application Factors, and Estimated Implementation Cost Ranges for Countermeasures at Signalized Intersections

Table 4: Crash Reduction Factors, Typical Crash Thresholds, Additional Application Factors, and Estimated Implementation Cost Ranges for Lighting Countermeasures at Unlit or Poorly Lit Intersections

Table 5: Crash Reduction Factors, Typical Crash Thresholds, Additional Application Factors, and Estimated Implementation Cost Ranges for Skid Resistance Countermeasures at Intersections with High Rates of Low-Friction Crashes

Table 6: Crash Reduction Factors, Typical Crash Thresholds, Additional Application Factors, and Estimated Implementation Cost Ranges for Countermeasures at Stop-Controlled Intersections with High-Speed Approaches

Table 7: Example of a Typical State Distribution of Crashes at Rural State Stop-Controlled Intersections (5 Years Crash Data)

Table 8: Example of Typical State Crash Severity for Various Intersection Types

List of Figures

Figure 1: Examples of Basic Low-Cost Countermeasures for Stop-Controlled Intersections – Double Up Oversize Warning Signs, Double STOP Signs, Traffic Island on Stop Approach (if feasible), Street Name Signs, Stop Bars, and Double Warning Arrow at the Stem of T-Intersections

Figure 2: Turn Restrictions at Multi-Lane Highways

Figure 3: Example Intersection with Basic 12 inch Lens, Back Plates and a Signal Head per Lane

Figure 4: New Design for Intersection Lighting Layout

Figure 5: New Design for Wide Roadway Intersection Lighting Layout

Figure 6: Lane Narrowing Using Rumble Strips

Figure 7: Intersection Categories for Low-Cost Countermeasure Consideration


FHWA triskelion logo.
For More Information:

Ed Rice
Intersection Safety Team Leader
FHWA Office of Safety
202.366.9064
ed.rice@dot.gov

U.S. Department of Transportation
Federal Highway Administration
1200 New Jersey Ave., SE
Washington, DC 20590
Toll-Free "Help Line" 866-367-7487
FHWA-SA-09-020

  Table of Contents Next >
Page last modified on September 4, 2014.
Safe Roads for a Safer Future - Investment in roadway safety saves lives
Federal Highway Administration | 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE | Washington, DC 20590 | 202-366-4000