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FHWA Home / Safety / HSIP / Railroad-Highway Grade Crossing Handbook

Railroad-Highway Grade Crossing Handbook - List of Figures

Railroad-Highway Grade Crossing Handbook - Revised Second Edition August 2007
List of Figures Table of Contents

List of Figures

1. Reflectorization Example—Standards Applicable to Boxcars
2. Number of Collisions by Number of Trains per Day per Crossing, 2004
3. U.S. DOT Crossing Inventory Form
4. Crossing Identification Number Tag
5. Accident Report Form for Federal Railroad Administration
6. Sample Questionnaire for Diagnostic Team Evaluation
7. Study Positions for Diagnostic Team
8. Crossing Sight Distances
9. Sight Distance for a Vehicle Stopped at Crossing
10. Type III Barricade
11. Typical Crossing Signs
12. Crossing Sign (Crossbuck)
13. Supplemental Advance Warning Signs
14. Substandard Clear Storage Distance
15. Possible Sign System Where Sight Distance Is Limited On Approach to the Crossing
16. Typical Sign System Where STOP or YIELD at Crossing Is Required
17. Highway-Rail Grade Crossing (Crossbuck) Sign and STOP and YIELD Sign on Same Post
18. Highway-Rail Grade Crossing (Crossbuck) Sign and STOP and YIELD Sign on Separate Posts
19. Example of Placement of Warning Signs and Pavement Markings at Highway-Rail Grade Crossings
20. Alternate Pavement Markings at Highway-Rail Grade Crossings
21. Typical Supplemental Signing and Pavement Marking Treatment for Railroad Crossings
22. Typical Alignment Pattern for Flashing Light Signals with 30-15 Degree Roundel, Two-Lane, Two-Way Roadwa
23. Typical Alignment Pattern for Flashing Light Signals with 20-32 Degree Roundel, Multilane Roadway
24. Typical Clearances for Flashing Light Signals with Automatic Gates
25. Typical Flashing Light Signal—Post Mounted
26. Typical Flashing Light Signal—Cantilevered
27. Use of Multiple Flashing Light Signals for Adequate Visibility Horizontal Curve to the Left
28. Use of Multiple Flashing Light Signals for Adequate Visibility Horizontal Curve to the Right
29. Typical Location of Signal Devices
30. Typical Location Plan, Right Angle Crossing, One-Way, Two Lanes
31. Typical Location Plan, Right Angle Crossing, One-Way, Three Lanes
32. Typical Location Plan, Divided Highway with Signals in Median, Two Lanes Each Way
33. Typical Location Plan, Divided Highway with Signals in Median, Three Lanes Each Way
34. Typical Location Plan, Divided Highway with Insufficient Median for Signals, Two Lanes Each Way
35. Typical Location Plan, Acute Angle Crossing for Divided Highway with Signals in Median, Two or Three Lanes Each Way
36. Typical Location Plan, Obtuse Angle Crossing for Divided Highway with Signals in Median, Two or Three Lanes Each Way
37. Example of Combination of Mountable and Non-Mountable Curbs from Illinois Department of Transportation
38. Example of Location Plan for Flashing Light Signals and Four-Quadrant Gates
39. Examples of Active Advance Warning Signs and Cantilevered Active Advance Warning Sign
40. Stand-By Power Arrangement
41. DC Track Circuit
42. Three-Track Circuit System
43. Track Circuits with Timing Sections
44. AC-DC Track Circuit
45. Audio Frequency Overlay Track Circuit
46. Motion-Sensitive Track Circuit, Bi-Directional Application
47. Motion-Sensitive Track Circuit, Uni-Directional Application
48. Constant Warning Time Track Circuit, Uni-Directional Application
49. Constant Warning Time Track Circuit, Bi-Directional Application
50. Pre-Signal Mounted on Railroad Cantilever, Rollins Road and State Route 83 at Wisconsin Central, Round Lake, Illinois
51. Pre-Signal Located Ahead of Grade Crossing with Displaced Stop Bar, S. Mary and W. Evelyn at Caltrain Commuter Line, Sunnyvale, California
52. Pre-Signal with Louvered Downstream Intersection Signal, Sierra and Orange at Metrolink Commuter Line, Fontana, California
53. Queue Cutter, Magnolia Street at Union Pacific Railroad, Riverside,California
54. Advance Head, Broadway and Arguello at Caltrain Commuter Line, Redwood City, California
55. Queue Prevention Strategies
56. Highway-Rail Grade Crossing Cross Section
57. Sample Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Worksheet
58. Sample Benefit-to-Cost Analysis Worksheet
59. Crossing Resource Allocation Procedure
60. Resource Allocation Procedure Field Verification Worksheet
61. Areas in a Traffic Control Zone
62. Typical Signs for Traffic Control in Work Zones
63. Use of Hand Signaling Devices by Flagger
64. Crossing Work Activities, Two-Lane Highway, One Lane Closed
65. Crossing Work Activities, Multi-Lane Urban Divided Highway, One Roadway Closed, Two-Way Traffic
66. Crossing Work Activities, Closure of Side Road Crossing
67. Crossing Work Activities, One Lane of Side Road Crossing Closed
68. Typical Private Crossing Sign 193
69. No Turns Internally Illuminated Signs
70. Placement of Flashing Light Signal Assemblies
71. Example Active Matrix Train Approaching Sign
72. Example Second Train Internally Illuminated Signs
73. ADA Dynamic Envelope Delineation in Sacramento, California
74. San Diego, California Curbside Pedestrian Barriers
75. Placement of Pedestrian Automatic Gates
76. Pedestrian Automatic Gate Examples
77. Pedestrian Swing Gate Examples
78. Bedstead Barrier Application
79. San Diego, California Pedestrian Z-Crossing
80. Illustrative Pedestrian Treatment
81. Recommended Sign and Marking Treatment for Bicycle Crossing
82. Highway-Rail Intersection Interface Overview
83. In-Vehicle Display


  Table of Contents
Page last modified on October 15, 2014.
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