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FHWA Home / Safety / Intersection / Intersection Safety

Intersection Proven Safety Countermeasure

Executive Summary: Corridor Access Management

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Managing access at the corridor level improves safety and business

Studies conducted by State and local agencies, national organizations, and transportation trade associations consistently show that corridor access management can improve safety, mobility, accessibility, and even business along an entire stretch of roadway because it favorably impacts ALL properties along that corridor.

Corridor Access Management (CAM) is a strategy that seeks an appropriate balance between the safety and mobility of a roadway facility with the access needs of adjacent land uses. CAM uses a combination of policies and strategies, such as closing, consolidating, or improving driveways, median openings, and intersections; adding or redesigning medians; and planned spacing of intersections, median openings, and driveways.

Exhibit 1: Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) conducted an analysis of the crashes in the corridor before and after the measures were in place. The results of the analysis showed that impleme nting access management practices significantly reduced accident severity and societal costs. (Source: WSDOT)

Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) conducted an analysis of the crashes in the corridor before and after the measures were in place. The results of the analysis showed that implementing access management practices significantly reduced accident severity and societal costs. Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) conducted an analysis of the crashes in the corridor before and after the measures were in place. The results of the analysis showed that implementing access management practices significantly reduced accident severity and societal costs.

Addressing the concerns about Corridor Access Management improvements with data

Business owners along a corridor may fear that access management improvements will disrupt or otherwise negatively impact their businesses, but several studies over many years have dispelled this myth. Studies and surveys of property owners and businesses from North Carolina, Texas, Florida, Minnesota, Kansas, and Iowa, among others, reveal that access management projects do not result in adverse effects, and, in fact, can be beneficial. Importantly, a common factor in achieving this long-term success is early and frequent consultation between the road agency and corridor stakeholders, with special emphasis on the construction phase.

Offering a range of safety options

Corridor access management techniques allow agencies to deploy flexible solutions for their unique environments. Common CAM techniques and their safety benefits include:

Improving operations for all stakeholders

Reducing the frequency of access points, properly spacing access points, and managing turning movements increases capacity, reduces delay, allows more consistent travel speeds, and delivers better quality of service for all road users.

Overcoming potential challenges

Planning and implementing CAM improvements calls for careful policy making and pre–determined strategies, including:

Using Visualization Tools

Visualization tools are used to enhance communication with multiple stakeholders by rendering a design, data, or other information in a visual format that can be easily understood. One such tool is the Corridor Visualization Explorer (CVE), which illustrates the effects of various access management strategies, can facilitate improvements planning and decision making, and aid in communicating with stakeholders.

LADOTD and the CVE Tool

The Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (LADOTD) sponsored a project to create a visualization prototype that can be used to improve how access management principles are conveyed to the public.

Exhibit 7: The user selects road and traffic conditions in the top pane. These are visualized in the middle pane. The effects of these decisions can be seen on the dials in the bottom pane, which also includes a note to user. Dragging the cursor over the dials reveals explanations of the results. (Source: Teach America)

The user selects road and traffic conditions in the top pane. These are visualized in the middle pane. The effects of these decisions can be seen on the dials in the bottom pane, which also includes a note to user. Dragging the cursor over the dials reveals explanations of the results.

Highway 101 Corridor Access Management Case Study, Shakopee, Minnesota

Scott County and the City of Shakopee, Minnesota, completed a successful CAM project on a nine–block urban business corridor on Highway 101 with intersections at each block and 41 private property accesses. City and county staff were charged with making safety and mobility improvements for a nearly 25,000 vpd in an 80' right–of–way. Officials decided on a five–lane undivided roadway with an "aggressive access management" process to remove redundant private access and encourage voluntary removal of private driveways. Nearly 50 percent of the private accesses were eliminated. The project exceeded the expectations of the business community.

For complete information, including references, please refer to the Corridor Access Management Technical Summary.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Office of Safety: Jeffrey Shaw, jeffrey.shaw@dot.gov

Office of Ope rations: Neil Spiller, neil.spiller@dot.gov

FHWA Resource Center: David Engstrom, david.engstrom@dot.gov

FHW A Intersection Safety Web site:http://safety.fhwa.dot.gov/intersection

U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration Safe Roads for a Safer Future

FHWA-SA-15-006

Page posted on May 20, 2016
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