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FHWA Home / Safety / Intersection / Strategy E10. Provide Improved Maintenance of Stop Signs

Strategy E10. Provide Improved Maintenance of Stop Signs

NCHRP Report 500 / Volume 5: A Guide for Addressing Unsignalized Intersection Collisions

WHERE TO USE

Photo of a stop sign that is leaning to the side, is scarred, is not reflective, and is surrounded by unmowed vegetation.
This photo illustrates a poorly maintained stop sign.
Photo by: Unknown

DETAILS

Maintenance of stop signs must be at a high standard to ensure that the effectiveness of the signs is retained. According to the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, stop signs must be kept in proper position, clean, and legible at all times (both day and night). Damaged signs should be replaced without undue delay. To ensure adequate maintenance, a suitable schedule for inspection, cleaning, and replacement of stop signs should be established. Employees of highway agencies, police, and other governmental employees whose duties require that they travel on the highways should be encouraged to report any damaged or obscured signs at the first opportunity. Special attention and necessary action should be taken to see that trees, shrubbery, and construction materials do not obscure stop signs and that the stop signs present proper reflectorization.

KEY TO SUCCESS

Determine an effective maintenance schedule that may be adequately sustained by highway agencies.

ISSUES

None identified

TIME FRAME: Short

This strategy does not require a long development process. A maintenance schedule can typically be developed in 3 months or less.

COSTS: Low

Costs for maintenance of stop signs are relatively low. An agency's maintenance costs may increase.

EFFECTIVENESS

TRIED: The effectiveness of this strategy has not been satisfactorily quantified.

COMPATIBILITY

This strategy can be used in conjunction with most other strategies for improving safety at unsignalized intersections.

For more details on this and other countermeasures: http://safety.transportation.org



For more information contact:

FHWA Office of Safety Design
E71, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE
Washington, D.C. 20590
(202) 366-9064
http://safety.fhwa.dot.gov

FHWA Resource Center – Safety and Design Team
19900 Governor's Drive, Suite 301
Olympia Fields, IL 60461
(708) 283-3545
https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/resourcecenter

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Page last modified on September 4, 2014.
Safe Roads for a Safer Future - Investment in roadway safety saves lives
Federal Highway Administration | 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE | Washington, DC 20590 | 202-366-4000