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FHWA Home / Safety / Pedestrian & Bicycle / Evaluation of the Focused Approach to Pedestrian Safety Program

Evaluation of the Focused Approach to Pedestrian Safety Program

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Appendix A. Case Studies

New York

PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION

In 2007, there were 278 pedestrian fatalities in New York state—the fourth highest in the nation. New York City, with more pedestrian fatalities than any other city, was selected as a focus city. New York’s FHWA Division office worked with the New York Metropolitan Transportation Council (NYMTC) to coordinate Program activities. Under the coordination of NYMTC, 12 courses have been delivered in locations throughout the NYMTC region and beyond including New York, Nassau, Suffolk, Westchester, and Orange counties. Attendees included transportation engineers, law enforcement personnel, transportation planners, and public officials from a variety of state and local government agencies. More than 280 people have received training through this Program. NYMTC continues to promote the courses to local municipalities within and beyond the New York City region.

Table A1. Pedestrian Safety Activities in New York
Activity Fiscal YearTotal
20062007
Developing a Pedestrian Safety Action Plan (1-day) 101
Designing for Pedestrian Safety (2-day) 6410
Designing for Pedestrian Safety (1-day) 101
Course Webcast 011
Total 85 13

REACTION

Testimony from course participants has been overwhelmingly positive. All evidence has pointed toward ongoing and excess demand for the Program course throughout the downstate New York region. Many course participants cited interest in attending additional courses on pedestrian safety topics or in providing additional opportunities for colleagues to attend the courses. Course participants felt that the courses:

OUTCOMES

Program activities improved participants’ understanding of pedestrian safety issues

The Focused Approach to Pedestrian Safety courses increased awareness of the importance of pedestrian safety among transportation professionals and agencies throughout the downstate region. This was especially true for engineers who attended the “Designing for Pedestrian Safety” course. For course participants who were already familiar with pedestrian safety issues and countermeasures, the courses reinvigorated their interest in implementing safety measures.

Program activities raised awareness of pedestrian safety issues.

The large number of courses in the downstate region likely increased their impact. Respondents suggested that repeated courses in New York City may have helped to create a critical mass of city employees across several disciplines—planning, operations, law enforcement, design, and construction—that were interested in pedestrian safety. This contributed to a shift in priorities towards greater concern for pedestrian issues. In addition, the courses may have had a positive multiplier effect, as they energized a number of course participants to raise awareness of pedestrian safety issues and countermeasures in their communities.

Program activities spurred various pedestrian safety projects and initiatives.

The courses provided transportation professionals from diverse disciplines with strategies to incorporate pedestrian safety in their work. Numerous participants have shared stories of their efforts to follow up on the course teachings with course trainers and coordinators and sought additional advice and training opportunities. Several design engineers from New York City and other towns have worked to incorporate pedestrian design considerations into numerous construction projects. Participants cited several specific examples of countermeasures and initiatives influenced by the courses, such as:

The examples listed above demonstrate the variety of approaches and applications of pedestrian safety initiatives undertaken by course participants. In the case of New Castle, for example, law enforcement personnel worked to create a law enforcement pedestrian safety plan. In Manhattan, traffic planners from the New York City Department of Transportation’s Division of Traffic Planning and engineers from the New York City Department of Design and Construction cited numerous examples of their agencies’ new approach to pedestrian safety. In the case of the former, engineers who participated in the training left with a new awareness and sense of responsibility for pedestrian safety. In the case of the latter, traffic planners have elevated the importance of pedestrian safety issues so that they no longer “take a back seat” to vehicular flow. Both Departments are now aggressively addressing pedestrian issues by widening sidewalks, creating pedestrian refuge islands, and shutting down traffic lanes.

SUGGESTIONS FOR PROGRAM IMPROVEMENT

Offer more courses and offer courses in locations beyond the downstate region.

Demand for the courses has far exceeded the available training capacity. Offering more courses and offering them more frequently would be important steps in promoting pedestrian safety within each agency that has expressed interest in the courses. Many participants expressed interest in hosting courses in their own localities or having colleagues attend the courses.

Allocate Program resources based on the severity of the pedestrian safety problem in each focus location.

Some interviewees felt that FHWA funding for courses should be commensurate with need and suggested that FHWA should provide greater support to areas with more pedestrians, such as New York. As seen in several New York City agencies, the multiple course offerings in Manhattan enabled certain agencies to achieve a critical mass of trained personnel that helped to change the approach to pedestrian issues across the agency.

Continue to use course instructors with both engineering and non-engineering backgrounds.

Several interviewees suggested that the success of the course was largely the result of the two excellent trainers from the FHWA Resource Center. The use of trainers from different backgrounds, Federal and state, engineer, and “advocate,” likely contributed to the appeal of the course to participants from different professions.

Customize course materials to address the specific challenges course participants face in their localities.

Several course participants stated that course content would be more effective if it were customized to address specific local issues. For example, several interviewees commented that material in the course dealing with multi-lane expressways or rural safety was not relevant to New York City. The aspect of the course most often singled out as useful or inspiring was the field exercise where participants diagnosed problems and developed recommendations to address location-specific issues.

GEORGIA

PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION

In 2006, Georgia had 148 pedestrian fatalities, ninth highest in the nation. Georgia’s FHWA Division office worked with GDOT to plan and implement Program activities. Since bicycle and pedestrian safety was selected as one of the emphasis areas for the state’s Strategic Highway Safety Plan, GDOT requested technical assistance technical assistance in developing its State Pedestrian Safety Action Plan to be included in the Strategic Highway Safety Plan.

GDOT offered the “Developing a Pedestrian Safety Action Plan” course before the other courses because they wanted to promote safety planning. In subsequent course offerings, GDOT targeted their invitations to people who they thought would have the most significant impact on pedestrian safety. Working with MPOs, GDOT continues to promote the courses around the state.

Table A2. Pedestrian Safety Activities in Georgia
Activity Fiscal YearTotal
20062007
Developing a Pedestrian Safety Action Plan (2-day) 101
Designing for Pedestrian Safety (2-day) 022
Technical Assistance 101
Total 22 4

REACTION

Interviewees reported that course participants were very pleased with the training. They felt that the courses:

Participants spoke favorably about the periodic conference calls and web conferences, saying that the events:

GDOT was pleased with the technical assistance provided through the Focused Approach Program. The consultant helped them make recommendations for improving pedestrian safety through changes in state policies.

OUTCOMES

Program activities improved awareness of pedestrian safety issues
Program activities increased awareness of pedestrian safety problems among transportation professionals and agencies. This was especially true for engineers who attended the “Designing for Pedestrian Safety” course.

The pedestrian safety audit done on a location that GDOT had flagged for improvements provided GDOT with information and ideas on pedestrian safety problems and countermeasures for that location

The courses included an exercise in which students analyzed a real-world location with pedestrian safety problems and recommended improvements. By choosing a location where GDOT plans to enhance walkability and pedestrian safety, course attendees provided GDOT with a practical list of possible design elements that could increase pedestrian safety in the chosen area. GDOT is currently working with a consultant on a safety improvement project at this location. This project will include some of the proposals generated by feedback obtained in the course.

The consultant working on the project noted, “GDOT has always been open to new ideas on pedestrian safety but he noted a real shift with the [Ponce] project. The scope of work was more specific and more complete—not the typical generic version.” He felt that “there had been some impact as a result of the Focused Approach to Pedestrian Safety workshops.” He said that GDOT engineers were “looking at more options—traffic calming types of solutions such as reducing the number of through lanes.” He also indicated that these approaches are unusual for GDOT to consider because the proposals might increase traffic delay. However, “the impact is not so significant for vehicles and the proposed improvements for pedestrian safety were more important.”

Developing the Pedestrian Safety Action Plan prior to offering the design course was important to provide a comprehensive approach to pedestrian safety rather than “jumping to solutions.”

GDOT felt that beginning the training with the PSAP course was instrumental in helping attendees understand the issues before identifying the solutions.

The technical assistance in the Focused Approach to Pedestrian Safety Program helped to identify priority issues for Georgia’s Pedestrian Safety Action Plan. Engaging the Atlanta Regional Commission in this process was beneficial in bringing municipal partners to the table in the development of the plan.

A number of the recommendations in the PSAP were based on the knowledge gained from the technical assistance in the Focused Approach to Pedestrian Safety Program. These recommendations include:

These recommendations/policy changes are important to provide tools for promoting pedestrian safety. Municipalities are encouraged to implement them (although GDOT cannot compel them to). Including the municipalities in the PSAP development process was important to achieve buy-in from local governments.

The Atlanta Regional Commission considered recommendations from the training when writing the Atlanta Region Bicycle Transportation and Pedestrian Walkways Plan (September 2007).

Because of the training, ARC identified a number of recommended practices for the Atlanta Region Bicycle Transportation and Pedestrian Walkways Plan: targeting investments to high-crash corridors, implementing “complete streets” practices in projects, and adding or improving crossings at un-signalized intersections and mid-block locations. In addition, ARC plans to update the Transportation Improvement Program blueprint to include pedestrian and bike projects using a formula for project prioritization which that was developed for the out of the 2007 bicycle and pedestrian safety plan.

Program activities have contributed to changes in how local governments address pedestrian safety

After participating in the courses, several local governments in the Atlanta area have contacted the ARC bicycle/pedestrian coordinator for advice and other resources on pedestrian safety design. They have also turned to ARC for advice and feedback on their local PSAP.

SUGGESTION FOR PROGRAM IMPROVEMENTS

Increase the number and frequency of courses

Demand for the courses far exceeded the available training capacity. GDOT has had to turn away many people who wanted to participate once the courses were full. Offering more courses and offering them more frequently would expand the reach of the Focused Approach to Pedestrian Safety to include everyone who wants to participate.

Include content on incorporating pedestrian safety considerations as a standard part of the project development process.

One of the most common problems cited by interviewees was that pedestrian safety is frequently addressed as an afterthought, a task that is outside the normal project development process. The Focused Approach to Pedestrian Safety courses could emphasize the importance of including pedestrian safety elements in the normal project development process and perhaps provide suggestions for process changes to address this problem.

Include components for bike safety and ADA compliance

It is sometimes difficult for transportation agencies to broaden their congestion-oriented planning and operations to consider non-motorized transportation and ADA compliance. Under such conditions, sending staff to a single pedestrian-related training event is difficult. It would be doubly difficult to, later on, send staff to ADA training and then to training on bicycle safety. Offering a single course covering these three topics would decrease the burden on attendees and their agencies.

Improve outreach to senior managers so that they understand the importance of supporting pedestrian safety initiatives and communicate this to employees directly involved in planning and designing transportation projects.

One interviewee stated that it would be beneficial to have “more direct communication between upper levels of organizations so that information about these types of initiatives spread to those who are working with these issues every day.” She also felt that “high-level managers in the various transportation-related organizations have not spread the word to people who actually do the work about being a focus state and what that means.”

Improve outreach to notify stakeholders of upcoming conference calls and web conferences.

Currently, notification about impending conference calls and web conferences is done informally. This haphazard method is not always sufficient to notify all interested stakeholders. Implementing a formal procedure for announcing upcoming events would help address this problem.

CHICAGO

PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION

With 48 pedestrian fatalities in 2007, Chicago has more pedestrian fatalities than all but two other cities—Los Angeles and New York City. With the support of FHWA’s Illinois Division Office, the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning (CMAP) coordinated the delivery of the Focused Approach to Pedestrian Safety activities. These included four courses in 2006 and 2007 and occasional participation in the Program’s periodic teleconferences calls and web conferences. CMAP also received technical assistance in the analysis of pedestrian safety data from the Chicago metropolitan area.

Table A3. Pedestrian Safety Activities in the Chicago Metropolitan Area
Activity Fiscal YearTotal
20062007
Developing a Pedestrian Safety Action Plan (2-day)1 01
Designing for Pedestrian Safety (2-day)1 01
Planning and Designing for Pedestrian Safety (3-day)0 22
Technical Assistancex NA 
Total2 24

REACTION

CMAP and the FHWA Division Office staff were taken aback upon learning that the City of Chicago had more pedestrian fatalities than almost every other city in the United States. When FHWA notified CMAP about the extent of Chicago’s pedestrian safety problems, CMAP was in the process of developing a bicycle and pedestrian plan. CMAP put the plan on hold until it conducted a thorough analysis of pedestrian safety data to understand the nature of the pedestrian safety problems in the metropolitan area. CMAP also decided to delay offering the pedestrian safety courses until after the data analysis so that the courses could address the most common pedestrian safety problems in the Chicago area.

While CMAP regularly compiled transportation safety information—including pedestrian safety—it had never specifically analyzed data on pedestrian safety. CMAP and the City of Chicago requested technical assistance offered by the Focused Approach to Pedestrian Safety to conduct a thorough data analysis with the assistance of the PBIC.

Every interviewee was pleased with the Program’s pedestrian safety courses. They felt that the courses:

Only one interviewee had participated in the periodic teleconferences and web conferences. He thought that they provide the opportunity to discuss pedestrian-safety-related problems and solutions with peers in other regions parts of the country.

OUTCOMES

Program activities emphasized the importance of pedestrian safety among transportation professionals and agencies.

FHWA’s involvement in the Program, combined with out-of-state course instructors, has given the topic a gravitas and credibility that was absent from locally produced awareness and training initiatives.

Program activities spurred various pedestrian-related initiatives in the Chicago area.

Participants in Program activities have developed an informal “community of practice” that helps them learn from each other

Each of the course offerings had a diverse set of attendees—engineers, planners, managers, advocates, consultants—working in different pedestrian-related fields— public works departments, city and state departments of transportation, consulting firms, public safety agencies, transit providers, and others. This is a mix of people who probably would not have come together were it not for the courses. Attendees have taken advantage of this opportunity to expand their network of colleagues and create a diverse “community of practice.”

SUGGESTIONS FOR PROGRAM IMPROVEMENT

Increase the number and frequency of courses

After delivering all the courses provided by the Program, there was still substantial need and demand for more training. Staff from the FHWA Resource Center stepped in and delivered additional courses using the curriculum designed for the Focused Approach to Pedestrian Safety Program.

Create a “train-the-trainer” initiative that would sustain local delivery of the courses over time.

Interviewees agreed that there was a need and interest in delivering more courses. Some interviewees felt that the courses should be delivered regularly—perhaps once a year—to update those who have already taken the courses and as an opportunity to train new employees. By training local people to deliver the courses, CMAP and others would be able make decisions on offering the courses independently of FHWA.

Lessons Learned:

CALIFORNIA

PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION

FHWA selected California as a focus state because of its high number of pedestrian fatalities—709 in 2006, more than any other state in the country. With the support of FHWA’s California Division Office and FHWA’s Resource Center, Caltrans led a comprehensive effort to deliver pedestrian safety training statewide. Under the coordination of the Caltrans Division of Transportation Planning Bicycle and Pedestrian Program, 13 pedestrian safety courses were offered throughout the state in fiscal years 2006-2007. In addition, several Californians augmented their training by participating in periodic teleconferences and web conferences sponsored by the FHWA’s Pedestrian Safety Program.

Table A4. Pedestrian Safety Courses in California
Activity Fiscal YearTotal
20062007
Developing a Pedestrian Safety Action Plan (2-day) 314
Designing for Pedestrian Safety (2-day) 055
Planning and Designing for Pedestrian Safety (3-day) 134
Total4 913

REACTION

Interviewees reported that course participants were very pleased with the courses. Participants felt that the courses:

They were also pleased that the courses were offered throughout the state because state and local government agencies are reluctant to authorize travel for their employees.

Interviewees spoke favorably about the periodic conference calls and web conferences, saying that the calls:

OUTCOMES

Program activities improved awareness of pedestrian safety issues

There was a consensus among interviewees that Program activities have created momentum for improved pedestrian safety initiatives at the state and local levels. For example, Caltrans, which has had four employees dedicated solely to pedestrian and bike safety since the late 1990s, took advantage of Program activities to focus and expand its pedestrian safety work. The courses have also given pedestrian safety issues legitimacy as a transportation issue rather than as an afterthought. Increasing awareness has been effective in stimulating dialogue on pedestrian safety that probably would not have occurred without the Program.

Program activities spurred various pedestrian safety initiatives throughout the state

The courses provided engineers and planners with strategies to incorporate pedestrian safety in their work. Caltrans staff said that some localities contacted them after the course requesting guidance on designing and implementing improvements to pedestrian facilities, such as curb extensions, marked crosswalks, median islands, and reduced curb radii.

After learning about the FHWA’s pedestrian safety training through his membership in the State Strategic Highway Safety Committee, the director of public works in a rural county in Northern California attended the “Designing for Pedestrian Safety” course. After the course, he coordinated additional training in his part of the state so that his staff could participate. The training provided his staff with a deeper understanding and appreciation of pedestrian safety issues and established new relationships among staff from the planning, engineering, and public health departments. Resulting pedestrian safety improvements include revising subdivision design regulations by requiring bike lanes and offset sidewalks; narrowing streets to ten-foot travel lanes with four-foot shoulders; and adding bulb-outs, roundabouts, speed humps, and crosswalks. The county is also working on updating its general plan to reflect Complete Streets guidelines.

In a Los Angeles suburb, the training was helpful in building relationships among engineers, planners, police, and transit operators. The city’s transportation planner continues to provide guidance to colleagues on pedestrian safety issues covered in the course. Some of the specific strategies she has seen implemented include zebra crosswalk striping, pedestrian refuge islands, in-pavement crosswalk lighting, and new pedestrian signals. In addition, the city is adding pedestrian countdown signals as they replace outdated signals. City officials are incorporating elements of the FHWA’s pedestrian safety training into the land use and circulation elements of their long-range land-use and zoning plans.

Program activities improved the ability of public officials to address pedestrian safety issues

Program activities have improved the ability of local governments to effectively and productively communicate the importance of pedestrian safety by providing real-life examples of “before and after” cases as well as qualitative and quantitative means of evaluating and explaining different strategies. One interviewee said that she has used slides from the courses to help explain pedestrian safety considerations for a project in her jurisdiction.

Program activities have prompted follow up training initiatives

SUGGESTIONS FOR PROGRAM IMPROVEMENT

Increase the number and frequency of courses

This recommendation addresses two problems: First, there has been more demand for the courses than there are training slots available. Offering more courses would address this problem. Also, demand for courses will probably continue to grow as new employees attend and as previous attendees reinforce their skills and keep current on the state of the practice. Offering courses regularly would address this problem.

Hire in-state (especially bilingual) trainers who can address problems unique to California and who can tailor courses based on local need

Ultimately, one of the best ways to sustain the training efforts begun by the Program might be through hiring in-state trainers. These trainers could keep course content current and relevant based on the individual needs of the state and of the various regions within the state.

Ensure that local in-kind matches for courses—logistics and hosting the event—do not require money or other resources that are prohibited by state law, especially travel; provide money for course planning logistics

Interviewees said that the local governments hosting courses were grateful that they did not have to spend money on trainers or training material. Also, delivering the training locally avoided the need for employees to travel to the course location, an important consideration given the reluctance of many states to fund employee travel. Nonetheless, several interviewees said that the logistics of course planning were complicated and time consuming and suggested that the FHWA assist in this task.

Distribute nationwide Focused Approach to Pedestrian Safety resources based on the extent of the pedestrian safety problem in the focus location.

Interviewees felt that Focused Approach to Pedestrian Safety resources could be better targeted to the locations most in need of pedestrian safety investments by allocating resources based on the extent of each state’s pedestrian safety problem.

MICHIGAN

PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION

In 2002, there were 175 pedestrian fatalities in Michigan, the eighth highest in the country, making it a focus state for the Focused Approach to Pedestrian Safety Program. Michigan’s FHWA division office worked with the MDOT to increase awareness of the Program and its training opportunities.

Before being designated a focus state, Michigan’s Governor’s Traffic Safety Advisory Commission had already begun the process of developing a Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety Action Plan as part of the state’s Strategic Highway Safety Plan. This group consists of representatives from the Governor’s office, the Departments of Community Health, Education, and Transportation as well as the State Police, the Office of Highway Safety Planning, the Office of the Services to the Aging, and three representatives from the county, city, and township level.

The focus state designation gave MDOT additional resources to promote pedestrian safety initiatives that will be included in the Strategic Highway Safety Plan. MDOT decided to offer the “Designing for Pedestrian Safety” course first because it provided practical safety countermeasures that could be used to engage local communities in pedestrian safety education.

Table A5 Pedestrian Safety Activities in Michigan
Activity Fiscal YearTotal
20062007
Developing a Pedestrian Safety Action Plan (2-day) 011
Designing for Pedestrian Safety (2-day) 404
Planning & Designing for Pedestrian Safety (3-day) 011
Total4 26

REACTION

MDOT felt that the focus state designation raised the visibility of pedestrian safety and encouraged them to consider pedestrian safety in all their efforts. MDOT staff who worked on safety issues initially thought that the focus state designation reflected poorly on their pedestrian safety work. However, they came to appreciate the training opportunities the designation provided and the momentum it gave to pedestrian safety improvements.

Interviewees said that course attendees were very pleased with the courses. They felt that the courses:

Interviewees spoke favorably about the conference calls and web conferences, saying that the events:

OUTCOMES

Program activities brought together professionals from different disciplines to jointly address pedestrian safety challenges.

Course attendees included transportation and public health professionals and agencies. By encouraging participation from agencies and professionals not directly related to transportation, the message of the courses reached a broader audience. Interviewees stated that the courses promoted better awareness and understanding of the connection between planning, engineering, and public health and safety. The Building Healthy Communities program managed by the Michigan Department of Community Health includes physical activity as one of its primary components. The training provided by the Program dovetailed nicely with the goal of bringing pedestrian and bicycle issues into master plans.

Program activities helped develop relationships among safety professionals from a variety of disciplines and encouraged an interdisciplinary approach to addressing safety issues.

The Michigan Department of Community Health has been working with MDOT for several years. The Program gave them an opportunity to promote pedestrian safety through this partnership, creating advocates for the issue.

Program activities helped draw funding to pedestrian safety issues.

Until 2006, Michigan did not use any of its targeted safety funding to address pedestrian safety. Detroit requested and received safety money to install pedestrian countdown signals after learning about them at the courses.

Program activities spurred various pedestrian safety initiatives.

State and local governments have used the information and visibility the Program activities to develop their own pedestrian safety initiatives. For example, Detroit— designated a pedestrian safety focus city—now considers pedestrian safety enhancements in all its projects, including signal modifications. New strategies resulting from the training include:

MDOT worked with the Michigan Attorney General’s office to create a presentation on pedestrian design and liability.

Some course participants felt that their ideas for pedestrian safety improvements were not seriously considered by their agency or jurisdiction. Policy makers have sometimes resisted innovative techniques out of concern that the new approaches might cause unintended safety problems and open the jurisdiction up to liability lawsuits. Policy makers expressed concerns about strategies such as road diets, mid-block crossings, and staggered crosswalks.

To address this concern, MDOT develop a presentation that demonstrated the safety and efficacy of these new pedestrian safety applications. With the help of the Michigan Attorney General’s Office, the presentation also included liability information specific to Michigan. The presentation has been successful in easing liability concerns. MDOT has delivered this presentation several times, including at a statewide conference on community health. Plans have been made to present it to the Michigan annual traffic safety summit, the County Road Association, and the Institute of Transportation Engineers.

Program courses helped with the creation of pedestrian safety audits.

Staff from FHWA’s Michigan division office are using the information from the Program courses and from another FHWA course on road safety audits to promote pedestrian safety audits. Traffic and safety specialists volunteered their time to implement the first road safety audit. Recommendations to improve pedestrian safety were developed and presented to MDOT’s executive committee. Managers at MDOT are exploring ways to continue the audits.

The Designing for Pedestrian Safety course has helped participants understand the links between ADA compliance and good design.

Installing ramps for ADA compliance is not always done correctly. The Focused Approach to Pedestrian Safety course provided useful information on the correct design and placement of ramps and crosswalks. Representatives from FHWA’s Michigan office have collected photographs of appropriate designs to address both ADA and pedestrian safety requirements.

SUGGESTIONS FOR PROGRAM IMPROVEMENT

Increase the number and frequency of courses

The six courses offered thus far have been well attended and well received. However, there is still high demand for the courses, especially outside the state’s major cities.

Conduct informal peer reviews of PSAPs.

Building on lessons learned from other states, representatives from FHWA or focus state peers could offer suggestions for improvements or changes to PSAPs.

Conduct a study to understand what safety-enhancement strategies have been most effective in improving pedestrian safety.

Providing empirical evidence of the effectiveness of new procedures would give added support when introducing strategies. This information would provide professionals with the ability to promote certain approaches to address specific problems, e.g., the most effective strategies for mid-block crossings based on road type and volume of traffic and pedestrians.

Include content including pedestrian safety considerations as a standard part of the project development process.

One of the most common problems cited by interviewees was that pedestrian safety considerations are frequently addressed as an afterthought, a task that is outside the normal project development process. The Focused Approach to Pedestrian Safety courses should emphasize the importance of including pedestrian safety elements in the normal project development process and perhaps provide suggestions for process changes to address this problem.

Include components for bike safety and ADA compliance

It can be difficult for transportation agencies to broaden their congestion-oriented planning and operations to consider non-motorized transportation and ADA compliance. Integrating these topics into a single training opportunity would provide a more comprehensive approach.

LESSONS LEARNED

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Page last modified on January 31, 2013.
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