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FHWA Home / Safety / Pedestrian & Bicycle / Pedestrian Safety Strategic Plan

Pedestrian Safety Strategic Plan: Background Report

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References

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  20. Chang, D. (2008). National Pedestrian Crash Report (DOT HS 810 968). Washington, DC: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Retrieved from http://www.walkinginfo.org/library/details.cfm?id=4396
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  221. Zhu, M., Cummings, P., Chu, H., & Xiang, H. (2008). Urban and rural variation in walking patterns and pedestrian crashes. Injury Prevention, 14:377-380.

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