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FHWA Home / Safety / Transportation Safety Planning (TSP) / Transportation Safety Planning

Transportation Safety Planning (TSP) – Presentation

FHWA Office of Safety logo: Safe Roads for a Safer Future – Investment in roadway safety saves lives.

U.S. Department of Transportation
Federal Highway Administration

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Logo: TSP - Transportation Safety Planning


Incorporating Safety Into the Planning Process

Photo Collage: Kids with bike helmets, motocycle riders passing Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over sign, Group of police motorcyces, Fire Truck, worker measureing side of road, front of car damage


Session Learning Objectives

Notes: There are three key learning objectives to this presentation:

  1. Understanding Transportation Safety Planning (TSP), the safety issue, and regulations that affect planners. TSP is a comprehensive, system-wide, multimodal, proactive process that better integrates safety into surface transportation decision-making.
  2. Identifying approaches and steps to integrate safety into the planning process.
  3. Providing resources

Objective 1

Understanding TSP


Screenshot: Comprehensive Multimodal System Wide Proactive booklet

Definition of TSP

Reducing transportation
fatalities and serious injuries
by supporting comprehensive,
system-wide, multimodal, data-
driven, and proactive regional
and statewide transportation
planning processes that
integrate safety into surface
transportation decision-making.


Note: This information is from the FHWA TSP Strategic Plan.


Map: Annual Fatal Crashes 2012

2012 Fatalities: 33,561
2012 Fatal Crashes: 30,800

Notes: A high level look at 2012 fatal crashes. The red dots show the distribution of crashes across the U.S.

Source:
HEPGIS – http://hepgis.fhwa.dot.gov/hepgismaps11/ViewMap.aspx?map=Annual%20Fatal%20Crashes|Annual%20Fatal%20Crashes%202012
FARS


Image: Magnifying glass - 2012 Snapshot

Over 33,000 people
died in a crash

About 90 people died each
day on U.S. roads

Crashes were the leading cause of death in those under 30

10,322 people died due to alcohol-impaired drivers

Crashes cost $99 billion in medical care, rehabilitation and lost wages


Note: These statistics provide a snapshot of the cost of fatal in the United States during 2012. STATISTICS SOURCE: NHTSA


Roadway Fatalities 2000-2012

Bar Chart: Roadway Fatalities 2000-2012
Data Source:
USDOT, NHTSA, Traffic Safety Facts

Notes: The downward trend in FATALITIES could potentially level off if continued progress is not monitored. According to FHWA, overall vehicle miles traveled (VMT) roadway fatalities increased slightly between 2011 and 2012 following a downward trend from 2006-2011. 2012 showed an increase of 0.3 percent over 2011. According to NHTSA, the fatality rate per 100 million VMT increased 3.6 percent to 1.14 in 2012.


Roadway Injuries 2000-2012

Roadway Injuries 2000-2012
Data Source:
USDOT, NHTSA, Traffic Safety Facts

Note: This data shows all reported INJURIES related to roadway crashes. Crash-related injuries have increased slightly since 2009.

According to NHTSA the overall injury rate increased by 6.7 percent from 2011 to 2012.


Pie Chart:Roadway Departure Only Crashes, 51%, Ohter Crashes 13%, Roadway Pedestrain Int. Crashes 10%, Pedestrian Only Chrases 9%, Intersection only Crashes 18%, Rodway Departure + Int 4.4%, Int. + Ped 3.9%, RwD + Ped 1.1%All 3 0.2% - Legend RwD: Roadway Departure, Int: Intersection, Ped: Pedestrians

Notes: These numbers help the transportation community identify areas needing attention so they can focus on strategies for safety improvements. For example, the high percentage of pedestrian fatalities across the U.S. from motor related vehicle crashes is one of the reasons for many non-motorized safety initiatives around the nation.

Source: FARS and Focused Approach to Safety


Legislation

On July 6, 2012,
President Obama signed into law
P.L. 112-141, the Moving Ahead for
Progress in the 21st Century Act
(MAP-21)

Notes: Under MAP-21, performance management will transform Federal highway programs and provide a means to more efficient investment of Federal transportation funds by focusing on national transportation goals, increasing the accountability and transparency of the Federal highway programs, and improving transportation investment decisionmaking through performance-based planning and programming (PBPP).

MAP-21 has a significant impact on the planning process due to a safety focus and continued movement toward a performance-based system. State DOTs and Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) will be required to establish and use a performance-based approach to transportation decision making and development of transportation plans.


Major Themes of MAP-21

Notes:

Sources: https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/map21/docs/12nov28_freight_provisions.pdf


National Goal Areas

[§1203; 23 USC 150(b)]

Safety – To achieve a significant reduction in traffic fatalities and serious injuries on public roads

MAP-21 establishes the National Goal Areas for Federal highway programs, including a goal for SAFETY. As a MAP-21 National Goal Area, safety should be considered in planning at all levels. Other goal areas include:

Infrastructure condition – To maintain the highway infrastructure asset in a state of good repair.

Congestion reduction – To achieve a significant reduction in congestion on the National Highway System.

System reliability – To improve the efficiency of the surface transportation system.

Freight movement and economic vitality – To improve the national freight network, strengthen the ability of rural communities to access national and international trade markets, and support regional economic development.

Environmental sustainability – To enhance the performance of the transportation system while protecting and enhancing the natural environment.

Reduced project delivery delays – To reduce project costs, promote jobs and the economy, and expedite the movement of people and goods by accelerating project design and delivery process through measures such as reducing regulatory burdens and improving agencies’ work practices.


Key Safety-Related Features of MAP-21

Metropolitan & Statewide plans must:

Increases size of existing HSIP.

Notes:

A cornerstone of the MAP-21 highway program is a transition to a performance and outcome-based program.

States will invest resources in projects to achieve individual targets that collectively make progress toward national goals.

Performance-based planning

State DOTs and MPOs will be required to establish and use a performance-based approach to transportation decision making and development of transportation plans.

Agencies will establish performance targets that address the MAP-21 surface transportation performance measures.

The performance targets selected by an MPO will be coordinated with State-level to ensure consistency to the maximum extent practicable. Performance targets selected will be coordinated with public transportation providers, to the maximum extent practicable, to ensure consistency with sections 5326(c) and 5329(d) of title 49.

MPOs are required to integrate into the metropolitan transportation planning process other performance-based transportation plans or processes.

The MPOs will establish performance targets not later than 180 days after the date that the relevant State or public transportation provider establishes performance targets.

Within 2 years of enactment of MAP-21, the structure of all MPOs will be required to include officials of public agencies that administer or operate public transportation systems.

Both Long Range Transportation plans (LRTP) and transportation improvement programs (TIP) will include descriptions of performance measures and performance targets used to assess projects and programs.

Highway Safety Improvement Program (HSIP)

The HSIP is a core Federal-aid program with the purpose of achieving a significant reduction in fatalities and serious injuries on all public roads, including non-state-owned public roads and roads on tribal lands. The HSIP emphasizes a data-driven, strategic approach to improving highway safety on all public roads that focuses on performance.

MAP-21 dramatically increases size of existing HSIP, calls on States to set targets for number of serious injuries & fatalities; and the DOT to establish measures, and strengthens linkages between HSIP and NHTSA programs.


State Highway Safety Improvement Program (HSIP)

Note: MAP 21 also calls for the advancement of States capabilities to conduct safety data collection, analysis, and integration.


Strategic Highway Safety Plan (SHSP)

Notes: To obligate HSIP funds, a State must develop, implement and update a SHSP, produce a program of projects or strategies to reduce identified safety problems, evaluate the SHSP on a regular basis, and update the SHSP every 5 years.

The legislation impacts SHSP through expansion of the list of participants involved during safety planning. Participants include county transportation officials, State reps of non-motorized users, & other major Federal, State, tribal & local safety stakeholders.


Objective 2

Integration of Safety into the Transportation Planning Process


The Comprehensive
4E Approach

Transportation Safety; Education, Engineering, Enforcement, Emergency Repsonse


Notes: Strategies for improving safety fall under four general areas, known as the Four Es: Engineering, Enforcement, Education, and Emergency Medical Services (EMS). These four areas reflect the multidisciplinary nature of transportation safety. Transportation Planners have the most opportunity to effect change in engineering, but also to some extent in education, enforcement, and EMS. Some examples include:

Incorporating elements of the 4Es into the planning process can continue to contribute to reduced crashes, injuries, and fatalities.

Source: http://tsp.trb.org/assets/FR_Safety%20Planner_1_17_07FINAL.pdf


Integrating Safety

Safety integration should include a multidisciplinary focus, e.g. planning, education, engineering, enforcement and emergency management.

Safety planning should also include multimodal components, such as rail, transit, commercial vehicles and non-motorized modes of travel.

State and local planners, engineers, and law enforcement may use cursory or in-depth analysis tools to determine system-wide safety concerns. Statewide data, software analysis tools, and data use training are available from the DOT.

Collaboration between MPOs, States, and local decision makers offers an important advantage for local safety teams. This effort is based on collaborative partnerships; people getting to know and work with other people at the community level.

Be proactive in promoting and including safety measures.


Source: Iowa TSP Forum & Peer Exchange (2003)


Traditional Transportation Planning Process

Traditional Transportation Planning Process

Notes: This graphic illustrates the transportation planning process and feedback loop. The graphic shows a process of vision and goal identification, comprehensive consideration of strategies, evaluation of processes, and collaboration between agencies and stakeholders in developing the LRTP. The process also includes project development, implementation and performance monitoring. Performance monitoring then informs the next round of visioning and goal setting.

Source: http://www.planning.dot.gov/documents/briefingbook/bbook_07.pdf


Performance-Based Transportation Planning Process

Performance-Based Transportation Planning Process

Notes: This graphic shows a recently updated planning process that integrates performance-based planning and programming (PBPP).

Source: https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/planning/performance_based_planning/pbpp_guidebook/page02.cfm


Planning

 

Engage Safety Stakeholders in the initial planning process

Identify safety as a major organizational goal

 

 

Identify existing safety concerns in the system, set targets to correct safety issues


Notes: Successful integration of safety impacts all steps in the transportation planning process as noted in these slides illustrating the performance-based planning process (PBPP) an opportunities to include safety in the process. Safety should be a consideration early in the planning process when stakeholders are first engaged and visioning begins.


Integrating Safety into the Process

Planning

 

  • Collect and analyze safety data
  • Use data to identify locations for safety treatments

Use safety policies from other planning documents as a guide for inclusion in the LRTP

Include safety-related scoring and ranking in the LRTP to establish safety as a factor in project selection


Notes: Successful integration of safety impacts all steps in the transportation planning process as noted in these slides illustrating the performance-based planning process (PBPP) an opportunities to include safety in the process.

Safety should be a consideration early in the planning process when stakeholders are first engaged and visioning begins. It is important to utilize data to drive decisions, including both reactive decisions (location-specific with crash history), and pro-active decisions (systemic approach). Therefore, also consider data availability during planning to craft Performance Measures for which data is available.


Integrating Safety into the Process

Investment Plan, Resource Allocation, Program of Projects, Programming, What will it take?

 

Design standalone safety projects

Integrate safety elements into other TIP projects


Notes: To successfully integrate safety, all steps of the planning process will be impacted. Make safety a priority when developing investment policies in long range plans. Integrate safety elements into the TIP. In the programming stage, design standalone safety projects.


Integrating Safety into the Process

Integrating Safety into the Process

 

Continually revise strategies to meet safety goals and objectives

Periodically assess progress toward safety performance measures

Evaluate successes in safety initiatives


Notes: Safety should continue to be a consideration during monitoring, evaluation, and reporting to track progress toward goals and make adjustments during the next round of planning and goal-setting.


Strategic Direction

Engage the community and develop a vision for the future during early planning stages.

Notes: It is valuable to integrate safety into the State and regional planning vision and strategic. During the early stages of the planning process it may be helpful to develop presentation materials illustrating local transportation safety problems or concerns.

Share with stakeholders the potential benefits of a comprehensive safety strategy (i.e., reduced injuries and fatalities, reduced cost to the public in terms of productivity, emergency services, travel delays and property damage). When writing vision statements, include language on safety.

Sources: https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/planning/transportation_safety_planning/, http://safety.fhwa.dot.gov/tsp/fhwahep09043/fhwahep09043.pdf


Goals and Objectives

Develop key outcomes for the planning process.

Notes: While developing goals and objectives during the planning process, keep safety improvements in mind. Use existing resources on performance-based planning to help generate strategic, measurable, agreed-upon, realistic, and time-bound objectives related to safety as well as other program areas. Ensure the objectives are measurable by considering how they will be measured as well as current data collection capabilities.


Performance Measures

Develop metrics as a basis for comparing improvement strategies.

Notes: Performance measures aid in monitoring system condition and change including informing decisionmakers and stakeholders on the impact of already implemented safety measures. Safety related performance measures generally consider crash rates, emergency response times, and public perception of safety for various modes. When developing performance measures be sure to consider data availability and collection feasibility so measurement will be possible during the monitoring and evaluation planning phase.

See a list of possible performance measures and related data source on p. 3 of the source below.

http://safety.fhwa.dot.gov/tsp/fhwahep09043/fhwahep09043.pdf


Analysis

Determine strategies based on an objective process such as criteria comparison, weighted scores, or cost/benefit analysis.

Notes: The ongoing process of analysis should continually inform the planning process by identifying new issues and opportunities for improvement. Analysis should take place over various time-spans including short, medium, and long, and at different project scales including corridor, sub-area, and region.


Programming

Make safety a priority in LRTP and integrate safety into the S/TIP

Notes: Programming includes the investment plan, resource allocation, and program of projects as outlined in the LRTP and S/TIP. Design standalone safety projects and integrate these safety elements in the S/TIP. Use project selection criteria to emphasize selection of projects that integrate safety elements.

Sources: https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/planning/performance_based_planning/pbpp_guidebook/pbppguidebook.pdf, http://safety.fhwa.dot.gov/tsp/fhwahep09043/fhwahep09043.pdf


Implementation & Evaluation

Implement strategies, evaluate program and policy effectiveness.

Notes: Once safety projects have been implemented, it is important to monitor the effectiveness and communicate effectiveness to stakeholders. Information collected and feedback received from stakeholders can inform the next round of visioning and goal-setting.


Objective 3

Resources

 

 


Resources

FHWA Office of Safety
http://safety.fhwa.dot.gov/tsp/

FHWA Office of Planning, Environment, & Realty Planning
https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/planning/transportation_safety_planning

Notes: Find resources on Transportation Safety Planning in these locations.

Additional resources are listed in individual modules


Final Thoughts

Notes:


Audience Specific Modules

Select modules appropriate for audience.


Applying TSP to Federal Level Planning

Note: Transportation Safety Planning and Federal-level planning


How does Transportation Safety
Planning Impact your Work?

Note: These are some of the ways Transportation Safety Planning may impact work at the Federal level.


Ways to Integrate Safety into
the Planning Process

Proactively promote, educate and communicate ways for State DOTs and planning organizations to integrate safety in transportation planning.

Note: It is important to look at ways to integrate safety into the planning process.


Tools and Resources

Note: These are some of the resources available to Federal level practitioners.


Applying TSP to State Level Planning

Note: Transportation Safety Planning and State-level planning


How does Transportation Safety
Planning Impact your Work?

Notes: These are some of the ways Transportation Safety Planning may impact work at the State level.

Source: https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/planning/performance_based_planning/pbpp_guidebook/pbppguidebook.pdf


Ways to Integrate Safety into
the Planning Process

Notes: It is important to look at ways to integrate safety into the planning process.

Source: http://tsp.trb.org/assets/FR_Safety%20Planner_1_17_07FINAL.pdf


Tools and Resources

Notes: These are some of the resources available for State level practitioners on transportation planning and performance-based planning.


Applying TSP to MPO Planning

Note: Applying Transportation Safety Planning to the MPO planning process


How does Transportation Safety Planning Impact your Work?

Notes: These are some of the ways Transportation Safety Planning may impact work of MPOs.


Ways to Integrate Safety into
the Planning Process

It is important to look at ways to integrate safety into the planning process as safety is a top concern in transportation planning.


Tools and Resources

Note: These are some of the resources available that look MPOs, transportation planning, and performance-based planning.


Applying TSP to Regional Transportation Planning

Notes: Applying Transportation Safety Planning to regional planning.

What is Regional Planning?

Regional planning is planning for a geographic area that transcends the boundaries of individual governmental units but that shares common social, economic, political, cultural, and natural resources, and transportation characteristics. A regional planning agency prepares plans that serve as a framework for planning by local governments and special districts.

Generally speaking, RPOs conduct planning for rural areas. There may or may not be dedicated funding set aside for RPO planning. Often, an RPO and MPO share some common board members.


How does Transportation Safety
Planning Impact your Work?

Notes: These are some of the ways Transportation Safety Planning may impact the work of RPOs.


Ways to Integrate Safety into the Planning Process

Notes: It is important to look at ways to integrate safety into the planning process as safety is a top concern in transportation planning.


Tools and Resources

Note: These are some of the resources available that look MPOs, transportation planning, and performance-based planning.


Applying TSP to Regional Transportation Planning

Notes: Applying Transportation Safety Planning to regional planning.

What is Regional Planning?

Regional planning is planning for a geographic area that transcends the boundaries of individual governmental units but that shares common social, economic, political, cultural, and natural resources, and transportation characteristics. A regional planning agency prepares plans that serve as a framework for planning by local governments and special districts.

Generally speaking, RPOs conduct planning for rural areas. There may or may not be dedicated funding set aside for RPO planning. Often, an RPO and MPO share some common board members.


How does Transportation Safety
Planning Impact your Work?

Notes: These are some of the ways Transportation Safety Planning may impact the work of RPOs.


Ways to Integrate Safety into
the Planning Process

Notes: It is important to look at ways to integrate safety into the planning process.


Tools and Resources

Note: These are some of the resources available that look at the role of local practitioners in transportation planning and performance-based planning.


Applying TSP to the work of
Elected & Appointed Officials

Note: Transportation Safety elected and appointed officials


How does Transportation Safety
Planning Impact your Work?

Note: These are some of the ways Transportation Safety Planning may impact the work of elected and appointed officials.


Ways to Integrate Safety into
the Planning Process

Note: It is important to look at ways to integrate safety into the planning process.


Tools and Resources

Note: These are some of the resources available that look at the role of elected and appointed officials in the transportation planning process.


Page last modified on January 29, 2015.
Safe Roads for a Safer Future - Investment in roadway safety saves lives
Federal Highway Administration | 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE | Washington, DC 20590 | 202-366-4000