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FHWA Home / Safety / Geometric Design / Publications / Mitigation Strategies For Design Exceptions

Improvements to SR 99

With the goals of increasing safety, improving pedestrian accommodation, and creating a more attractive corridor, the cities’ redevelopment plans included several specific proposed improvements to SR 99:

Figure 100.  Drawing of proposed improvements to SR 99 in Shoreline.

FIGURE 100

Drawing of proposed improvements to SR 99 in Shoreline.

Figure 100 is an artist’s rendering of proposed improvements to SR 99 at an intersection in Shoreline. The rendering shows a road with two lanes in each direction and a raised, landscaped median; brick–paved pedestrian crosswalks and dedicated left–turn lanes at the intersection; overhead traffic signals; blue decorative streetlights; wide sidewalks; and a dedicated bus transit lane.

Figure 101.  Left-turn lane and U-turn areas after reconstruction in Federal Way.  A much greater level of access control was achieved.

Figure 101.  Left-turn lane and U-turn areas after reconstruction in Federal Way.  A much greater level of access control was achieved.

FIGURE 101

Left-turn lane and U-turn areas after reconstruction in Federal Way.  A much greater level of access control was achieved.

Figure 101 consists of two photos of left-turn and U-turn areas along SR 99 in the community of Federal Way.  In both photos, these areas are between the travel lanes and a landscaped median. Vertical rectangular signs mounted in the median contain the words LEFT & U TURN AHEAD in advance of the turning area. The signs are white with black borders and lettering.

Figure 102.  New transit stop in Des Moines.

FIGURE 102

New transit stop in Des Moines

Figure 102 is a photo showing a new transit (bus) stop on SR 99 in the community of Des Moines.  The facility’s amenities include a bus shelter with etched glass sides, pedestrian and street lighting that has been painted to match the shelter structure color, special curb markings, landscaped areas, and a wide paved sidewalk. The lane adjacent to the transit stop has a diamond painted on it.

BEFORE

Figure 103.  SR 99 before-and- after reconstruction in Des Moines.  Conditions for pedestrians along the corridor were greatly improved (BEFORE).

AFTER

Figure 103.  SR 99 before-and- after reconstruction in Des Moines.  Conditions for pedestrians along the corridor were greatly improved (AFTER)..

FIGURE 103

SR 99 before (top photo) and after (bottom photo) reconstruction in Des Moines.  Conditions for pedestrians along the corridor were greatly improved.

Figure 103 consists of two photos showing before–and–after conditions at a bus stop along SR 99 in Des Moines.  In the top (before) photo, pedestrians are waiting at the bus stop in an unevenly paved area that lacks a sidewalk and contains multiple driveways, a raised platform for a fire hydrant, overhead utility lines along the sides and crossing the road, and scattered debris and trash on the ground.  A gas station is in the background. In the bottom (after) photo, the driveways have been removed and a wide paved sidewalk has been installed.  New decorative light poles have replaced the utility lines and poles, and a new bus shelter has been installed.  The wide paved shoulder next to the road has been transformed into a lane for buses, with an expanded pull-out/pull-in section in front of the bus shelter.
 
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Page last modified on April 1, 2019
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