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Chapter 6. Highway-Rail Grade Crossing

Proven Practices

Proven Practices

  1. Passive Traffic Control Devices
  2. Lighting

50. Passive Traffic Control Devices

A. Post-Mounted Delineators

For rural passive grade crossings that are not illuminated, it is recommended that the approach be delineated with post-mounted delineators spaced 50 ft or closer together on the right shoulder, from the location of the Railroad Advance Warning sign (W10-1) to the crossbuck, and extending an equal distance beyond the crossbuck (as illustrated in Figure 68).

Figure 68. An image of an overhead view of a section of two-lane two-way highway with a railroad crossing in the middle of the section.  The image shows recommended placement of post-mounted delineators, pavement markings, and signs on each approach to the railroad crossing.

Figure 68. Recommended placement of post-mounted delineators

The rationale and supporting evidence for these treatments can be found beginning on page 332 of the Handbook.

51. Lighting

A. Luminaire Type/Alignment

Illumination at a crossing may be effective in reducing nighttime collisions. Illuminating most crossings is technically feasible because more than 90 percent of all crossings have commercial power available. Illumination may be effective under the following conditions:

Luminaires may provide a low-cost alternative to active traffic control devices on industrial or mine tracks where switching operations are carried out at night.

Luminaire supports should be placed in accordance with the principles in the Roadside Design Guide and NCHRP Report 350. If they are placed in the clear zone on a high-speed road, they should be breakaway.

The rationale and supporting evidence for these treatments can be found beginning on page 343 of the Handbook.

Page last modified on December 29, 2015
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