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FHWA Home / Safety / Pedestrian & Bicycle / Report of Focus Group Discussions in Washington, New York, Miami, and Los Angeles

Report of Focus Group Discussions in Washington, New York, Miami, and Los Angeles

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Research Logistics

Recruitment Process for Focus Groups

The Media Network designed recruiting screeners to make sure that participants in the focus groups fit the profile of respondents FHWA/NHTSA was seeking. We had two different group types in each city: Hispanic pedestrians and Hispanic bicyclists. Our goal was to have approximately eight to nine participants in each group. The Media Network worked with partners from its own proprietary database, community centers, and other local organizations (including local biking associations) to obtain names of people who fit the criteria to participate in these focus groups (Spanish-speaking Hispanic males and females, over the age of 18, who were regular walkers or bicycle riders). Our goal was to create diverse groups of respondents in each city. Potential participants were contacted by telephone and were screened to verify their eligibility. See the Appendix for the screeners used in this project.

Eligible participants were invited to participate in the groups, and were assured of the personal confidentiality and research-oriented purpose of the groups. These participants were not informed of the sponsor of this project. Confirmation letters with the time and location of the group were sent to all participants, as well as directions to the facilities where the groups were being held. Participants were called the night before the sessions to remind and encourage them to attend.

Profile of Respondents

Sixty-two (62) adults participated in these focus group sessions: twenty-eight (28) men and thirty-four (34) women. Out of these participants, thirty-five (35) participated in the pedestrian safety focus groups, and twenty-seven (27) participated in the bicycle safety focus groups. All of the participants were of Hispanic origin. Information on each of these participants is summarized in the tables below. There is one table for each of the eight focus groups.



Hispanic Pedestrians in Washington, DC:
Respondent
Name
Country of
Origin
Age Gender Education Income
Leonardo Colombia 40-49 M Graduate or Professional Degree More than $60,000
Maria Brazil 70-79 F Some College Between $15,000 – $25,000
Angela Colombia 30-39 F Graduate or Professional Degree Between $40,000 – $60,000
Gabriela Venezuela 30-39 F Some College More than $60,000
Ana Puerto Rico 40-49 F Graduate or Professional Degree Between $40,000 – $60,000
Milton Guatemala 18-29 M Less than High School Between $15,000 – $25,000
Alberto Nicaragua 30-39 M College Degree More than $60,000
Liliana Colombia 30-39 F Graduate or Professional Degree Between $25,000 – $40,000
Naomi Puerto Rico 70-79 F Some College Less than $15,000


Hispanic Pedestrians in Los Angeles, CA:
Respondent
Name
Country of
Origin
Age Gender Education Income
Elisa Mexico 18-29 F High School Degree Between
$25,000 – $40,000
Ana Ecuador 18-29 F College Degree Between
$40,000 – $60,000
Sussie Mexico 50-59 F Some College Between
$40,000 - $60,000
Jose El Salvador 40-49 M High School Degree $15,000 – $25,000
Miriam El Salvador 40-49 F High School Degree Less than $15,000
Lauro Mexico 60-69 M Less than High School Less than $15,000
Iris Guatemala 18-29 F Less than High School Between
$15,000 – $25,000
Martin Mexico 30-39 M High School Degree Between
$15,000 – $25,000


Hispanic Pedestrians in Miami, FL:
Respondent
Name
Country of
Origin
Age Gender Education Income
Magali Cuba 50-59 F High School Degree Between
$25,000 – $40,000
Santiago Colombia 60-69 M Less than High School Less than $15,000
Mariana Cuba 18-29 F College Degree Between
$25,000 – $40,000
Daisy Nicaragua 50-59 F High School Degree Less than $15,000
Berta Cuba 60-69 F High School Degree Less than $15,000
Raul Argentina 50-59 M High School Degree/GED Between
$40,000 – $60,000
Patricia Panama 40-49 F Some College Less than $15,000
Jaime Nicaragua 50-59 M College Degree Less than $15,000


Hispanic Pedestrians in New York City, NY:
Respondent
Name
Country of
Origin
Age Gender Education Income
Juan Dominican Republic 50-59 M Graduate or Professional Degree More than $60,000
Humberto Peru 60-69 M High School Degree Between
$40,000 – $60,000
Kimberly Puerto Rico 18-29 F Some College Between
$40,000 – $60,000
Evelyn USA 40-49 F High School Degree/GED Between
$15,000 – $25,000
Eddie Guatemala 18-29 M High School Degree Between
$25,000 – $40,000
Milagros Puerto Rico 60-69 F Less than High School Between
$15,000 - $25,000
Yesenia Puerto Rico 30-39 F High School Degree Between
$40,000 - $60,000
John Cuba 40-49 M High School Degree Between
$25,000 - $40,000
Roberto Argentina 80 or older M College Degree Between
$25,000 - $40,000
Nilda Argentina 70-79 F Some College Between
$15,000 - $25,000


Hispanic Bicyclists in Washington, DC:
Respondent
Name
Country of
Origin
Age Gender Education Income
Gabriela Ecuador 18-29 F College Degree Between $25,000 - $40,000
Raúl USA 18-29 M College Degree Between $25,000 - $40,000
Francisco Argentina 30-39 M High School Degree Between
$15,000 - $25,000
Jorge Honduras 30-39 M College Degree Between
$15,000 - $25,000
César El Salvador 50-59 M Some College Less than $15,000
Rosa Peru 30-39 F Graduate or Professional Degree Between
$25,000 - $40,000
Maritza Colombia 40-49 F College Degree Between
$25,000 - $40,000


Hispanic Bicyclists in Los Angeles, CA:
Respondent
Name
Country of
Origin
Age Gender Education Income
Francisco Ecuador 30-39 M Some College Between
$40,000 – $60,000
Elsa Puerto Rico 50-59 F Professional Degree More than $60,000
Eduardo Mexico 30-39 M College Degree Between
$15,000 – $25,000
Ezequiel Mexico 30-39 M Less than High School Less than $15,000
Angela Guatemala 50-59 F College Degree Between
$40,000 – $60,000
Brenda Puerto Rico 40-49 F College Degree Between
$40,000 – $60,000


Hispanic Bicyclists in Miami, FL:
Respondent
Name
Country of
Origin
Age Gender Education Income
Alfredo Cuba 60-69 M College Degree Between $15,000 – $25,000
Virginia Puerto Rico 50-59 F Less than High School Less than $15,000
Will Dominican Republic 30-39 M Some College More than $60,000
Monica Peru 18-29 F College Degree Between
$25,000 – $40,000
Israel Honduras Honduras M Less than High School Less than $15,000
Neftali Puerto Rico 30-39 M High School Degree Less than $15,000
Marta Cuba 40-49 F Less than High School Between
$15,000 – $25,000
Melinda Panama 50-59 F High School Degree Between
$25,000 – $40,000


Hispanic Bicyclists in New York City, NY:
Respondent
Name
Country of
Origin
Age Gender Education Income
David Costa Rica 40-49 M High School Degree/GED Less than $15,000
Marisol USA 18-29 F College Degree Between
$25,000 – $40,000
Magaly Puerto Rico 30-39 F Some College Between
$25,000 – $40,000
Julio Cuba 40-49 M Graduate or Professional Degree Less than $15,000
Reyes Puerto Rico 40-49 F Some College Between
$25,000 – $40,000
Willie Peru 40-49 M High School Degree Between
$40,000 – $60,000

Focus Group Methodology

The focus groups were held in March, April, and May 2004 in Silver Spring, MD (just outside Washington, DC), New York, Miami, and Los Angeles. Each group was led by a professional bilingual focus group moderator. The groups lasted about two hours and were conducted in Spanish. In each city, we conducted one group with bicyclists and one group with pedestrians. Each participant signed an agreement to acknowledge that the session was being recorded (audio only), and informing them that their personal information would be kept confidential. Participants were provided with a light dinner, as well as a cash stipend for their participation.

At the beginning of the discussion, participants were encouraged to share their ideas and were told that there were no wrong answers to the questions being asked. Participants were advised of "ground rules" for the discussion, which included the role of the moderator and what constitutes appropriate participant behavior. They were then reminded that they were being recorded.

To begin the discussion, participants introduced themselves to one another and to the moderator. They were then led through the research questions in the moderator's guide, which focused on issues such as general attitudes about bicycle and pedestrian safety, knowledge of U.S. traffic laws, sources of information about these laws and safety issues, and overall interest in this topic. Detailed findings from these groups follow in the next section of this report.

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Page last modified on January 31, 2013.
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