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FHWA Home / Safety / Pedestrian & Bicycle / Promoting Pedestrian and Bicyclist Safety to Hispanic Audiences

Promoting Pedestrian and Bicyclist Safety to Hispanic Audiences

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Appendix B. FHWA/NHTSA/Project Team Teleconference

FHWA, NHTSA, and members of the project team held a teleconference in June 2005. FHWA and NHTSA indicated some priority messages to be conveyed to pedestrians and bicyclists.

Pedestrians:

  1. Always use the crosswalk when provided to cross the street. However, do not assume that drivers will stop for you. Look before crossing.
  2. Know the meaning of the pedestrian signals. The steady walking man symbol means it is fine to cross. The flashing hand means that one can continue crossing if already in the street, but one should not start to cross. The steady hand means do not cross.
  3. Be predictable. Stay off freeways and restricted zones. Use sidewalks where provided. Cross or enter streets where it is legal to do so.
  4. Where no sidewalks are provided, it is safer to walk facing road traffic so you can get out of the way if a driver leaves the road.
  5. Use extra caution when crossing multiple lane, higher speed streets.

Bicyclists:

  1. Always wear a properly fitting bike helmet.
  2. Make sure your bike is properly equipped with lights and reflectors if you are riding on the road at dark or under low light conditions (e.g., dusk, rain, fog).
  3. Ride in a straight line and signal for turns and changing lanes. Obey all traffic laws including stop signs, traffic lights, and yielding to pedestrians just like a motorist. Ride in the right direction and on the right.
  4. Sidewalk riding is unlawful in some areas. Find out the laws in your area.

Both:

  1. Be wary. Most drivers are nice people, but do not count on them paying attention. Watch out, and make eye contact to be sure they see you.
  2. Alcohol and drugs can impair your ability to walk or bike safely, just as they impair a person's ability to drive.
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Page last modified on January 31, 2013.
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