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FHWA Home / Safety / Pedestrian & Bicycle / Final Detailed Findings Report for Marketing Plan and Outreach Materials

Final Detailed Findings Report for Marketing Plan and Outreach Materials that Promote Pedestrian and Bicyclist Safety to Different Hispanic Populations in the United States

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Section 6. Pedestrian Safety Campaign Planner: A Step-by-Step Guide and Materials to Implement a Public Information and Education Campaign for Pedestrian Safety

6.1 Introduction

FHWA's Pedestrian Safety Campaign Planner consists of a how-to guide, a video with TV PSAs, brochures, posters, an audio CD with radio PSAs and data CDs with print ads, posters, brochures, slides, TV PSAs, press releases and newspaper articles. Any community or organization can use these materials to promote pedestrian safety.

6.2 Summary

The PSAs, posters and brochures are available in English. No TV or radio PSAs were made in Spanish; only print PSAs, some articles and some posters are available in Spanish. The decision to include Spanish language materials was not based on concrete analysis. The TV PSAs include two directed at drivers and two at pedestrians. Five of the six radio PSAs are aimed at drivers. Six print PSAs target drivers and four target pedestrians. The brochures address pedestrians wearing reflective materials and the meaning of the pedestrian signals. Most of the TV, radio and print PSAs rely heavily on emotional appeals. For example, one print PSA depicts two paramedics tending to an injured girl lying on the pavement. In the English version, text superimposed over the photo reads, "I should have seen the little girl in the crosswalk". Large text at the bottom reads "Stop for Pedestrians. Think of the Impact You Could Make."

As another example, in one of the radio PSAs, a young girl's voice can be heard over the sounds of traffic. She is upset as she asks, "Why was that driver in such a hurry? He was looking for other cars as he turned the corner. He wasn't looking for my mom in the crosswalk." The sound of tires screeching, a scream, and then a shattering windshield are heard next, followed by silence. Full of anguish, the girl continues, "I really miss her..." The narrator then says, "Please look for pedestrians. Stop for them. Think of the impact you can make. A message from the Federal Highway Administration."

FHWA's Pedestrian Safety Campaign is being tested in three cities – Missoula, MT, Oceanside, CA and Washington, DC. An ongoing research project, scheduled to be completed in September 2005, is evaluating the effectiveness of the campaigns with respect to (1) pedestrian and motorist awareness of the campaigns, (2) pedestrian and motorist understanding of safe and legal behaviors, and (3) observed pedestrian and motorist behaviors.

6.3 Questions Answered

In what pedestrian and bicycle safety-related areas is communication with Hispanic audiences most needed?

The key pedestrian safety-related areas are:

The Planner does not specify whether these safety-related areas would be different depending on ethnicity/race.

What types of messages are most likely to have the most impact?

The campaign relies mostly on messages with emotional appeal, for example, a driver distraught over having hit a pedestrian or a family member in anguish over having lost a loved one in a pedestrian crash. The Planner does not specify which messages may have a greater impact on a Hispanic audience.

What are the best "media" for getting the messages across? Could the messages be effectively promoted in specific locations frequented by Hispanics?

The Planner includes a variety of TV, radio and print PSAs. Suggested places for print PSAs include company and organizational newsletters, billboards, and store flyers. Brochures can be distributed through direct mail, in schools and offices, at performances, in restaurants, and other venues. The Planner does not suggest locations specifically for Hispanics.

Which age groups of Hispanics should be targeted and why?

The campaign targets young drivers and working-age adult pedestrians. The Planner does not specify whether the age groups would be different depending on ethnicity or race.

Should materials be presented just in Spanish, or in English and Portuguese as well?

English TV and radio PSAs, posters and brochures are available; Spanish versions of the print PSAs, some posters and some brochures are available. The campaign materials do not include Portuguese.

6.4 Outstanding questions

In what pedestrian and bicycle safety-related areas is communication with Hispanic audiences most needed?

This campaign does not address bicycle safety.

Which Hispanic groups should be targeted and why?

This campaign does not target specific Hispanic groups such as migrant workers or recent immigrants.

Should different cultural groups be targeted and why?

This campaign does not target different cultural groups.

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Page last modified on January 31, 2013.
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