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FHWA Home / Safety / Pedestrian & Bicycle / FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

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LESSON 2: PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE ACTIVITY TODAY (INSTRUCTOR'S NOTES)

Objectives:

Upon completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Estimate current levels of walking and biking activity in their community.
  2. Explain how and why people decide to walk or bike.
  3. Plan strategies to increase walking and biking activity.
  4. Recognize various "at-risk" highway user populations (i.e., the young and the elderly) and how the risks to these groups can be managed through the promotion of walking and biking strategies.

Pre-Instruction:

Components

Activities

Motivation

Find someone in your community who regularly uses his or her bicycle for commuting, shopping, or other non-recreational trips. Ask this person to talk to your class about their experience as a person who is able to get along without being overly dependent on an automobile.

Objectives

Present and explain the four lesson goals listed above (V-2-1).

Information Presentation:

Components

Activities

Information Sequence

Outline the presentation of the lecture (V-2-2).

Information

Illustrate how much biking and walking people actually do.

Summarize the factors that influence an individual's decision to walk or bike (V-2-3).

Point out that there are many different strategies that can be used to encourage more bicycling and walking (V-2-4).

Discuss how people who are transportation disadvantaged (i.e., children, older adults, and the disabled) can benefit from improvements to the biking and walking systems.

Example(s)

Use the graphics from the text to highlight how much biking and walking people already do.

Student Participation:

Components

Activities

Practice

During the class period, ask students to write down their travel activities for the day by mode. Ask them to consider which trips might have been replaced by a bicycle or pedestrian trip.

Engage the class in a discussion of their results. Probe individuals as to why they believe that some of their trip-making could not have been done by walking or biking.

Feedback

Provide comment and feedback to the class as appropriate.

Follow-Up:

Components

Activities

Enrichment

Assign reading for Lesson 3.

Ask the students to look for pedestrian and bicycle accident statistics from some national database (e.g., U.S. Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics (http://www.bts.gov). Have them bring to class the most amazing or surprising statistics that they find.

Review

Lesson Objectives:

Lesson Outline:

Factors Influencing Walking/Biking Decisions:

Strategies to Encourage Bicycling and Walking:

Lesson Summary:

 

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Page last modified on February 1, 2013.
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Federal Highway Administration | 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE | Washington, DC 20590 | 202-366-4000