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FHWA Home / Safety / Pedestrian & Bicycle / FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

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LESSON 3: BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN PLANNING OVERVIEW (INSTRUCTOR'S NOTES)

Objectives:

Upon completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the impact of the current Federal surface transportation funding on bicycle and pedestrian planning.
  2. State what elements are part of a local bicycle or pedestrian plan.
  3. Use different types of analytical tools in bicycle and pedestrian planning processes.
  4. Recognize the different types of mapping techniques used for bicycle and pedestrian planning.

Pre-Instruction:

Components

Activities

Motivation

Secure a copy of a state or local pedestrian or bicycle plan. Discuss the different elements of the plan with the class. Consider how each of the elements was developed.

Objectives

Present and explain the four lesson goals listed above (V-3-1).

Information Presentation:

Components

Activities

Information Sequence

Outline the presentation of the lecture (V-3-2).

Information

Provide a general explanation of the most recent Federal surface transportation law. Detail how this law affects planning, design, operation, and maintenance of pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Present and explain the importance of the different elements and sub-elements of a local pedestrian plan and a local bicycle plan (V-3-3 and V-3-4).

Present the latent demand score (LDS) model as an example of an analytical technique that can be used for non-motorized transportation planning (V-3-5).

Show the class different examples of how maps are used in the bicycle and pedestrian planning processes (V-3-6).

Example(s)

Much of the information transmission should be done by way of example. The viewgraphs reflect this.

Student Participation:

Components

Activities

Practice

After the information presentation has taken place, have the students critique the bicycle/pedestrian plans that they generated as a pre-class activity.

Feedback

Provide comment and feedback to the class as appropriate.

Follow-Up:

Components

Activities

Enrichment

Assign reading for Lesson 4.

As with the prior lesson, provide each student with a map of your local area. Ask them to plan an "idealized" or "optimal" bicycle or pedestrian network for the area.

Review

Lesson Objectives:

Lesson Outline:

Elements of a Local Pedestrian Plan:

Elements of a Local Bicycle Network Plan:

Application of the LDS Model:

Types of Maps:

Lesson Summary:

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Page last modified on February 1, 2013.
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