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FHWA Home / Safety / Pedestrian & Bicycle / FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

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LESSON 9: BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN CONNECTIONS TO TRANSIT (INSTRUCTOR'S NOTES)

Objectives:

Upon completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the problems related to the lack of pedestrian and bicycle connections to transit.
  2. Cite examples of how pedestrians are being accommodated by transit services.
  3. Cite examples of how bicyclists are being accommodated by transit services.
  4. Describe the elements of programs wherein pedestrian and bicycle travel has been successfully integrated with transit.

Pre-Instruction:

Components

Activities

Motivation

Ask the class to present the results of their inquiries regarding how well
your local transit agency accommodates pedestrians and bicyclists.

Objectives

Present and explain the four lesson goals listed above (V-9-1).

Information Presentation:

Components

Activities

Information Sequence

Outline the presentation of the lecture (V-9-2 and V-9-3).

Information

Describe the problems and opportunities related to providing good bicycle and pedestrian connections to transit.

Discuss examples of how some cities are providing good connections to transit services for pedestrians.

Explain why and how bicycles should be integrated with transit (V-9-4 and V-9-5). Cover the various concerns of both the transit agency and
bicyclists (V-9-6 and V-9-7).

Describe the “bikes on buses” and “bikes on rails” programs.

Describe different types of bicycle parking facilities.
Cite the elements of successful bike-transit programs (V-9-8).

Example(s)

Show multiple examples (e.g., slides, videotape) of some of the methods cited in the Student’s Guide regarding how transit agencies accommodate pedestrians and bicyclists.

Student Participation:

Components

Activities

Practice

Use either of the exercises presented at the end of the Student’s Guide section.

Feedback

Provide comment and feedback to the class as appropriate.

Follow-Up:

Components

Activities

Enrichment

Assign reading for Lesson 10.
Have the students locate information on biking and walking trails in the area. Ask them to consider both functional (i.e., home-based work, home-based shopping, non-home-based shopping) travel and recreational (both home-based and non-home-based) travel needs.

Review

Review
Provide a summary of Lesson 9 (V-9-9).

Exercise

Ask the students to complete the exercise at the end of Lesson 9 in their workbooks. This exercise is reprinted below for your convenience.

9.12 Exercise
Choose a local transit station (or individual transit stop) and determine the potential catchment area. Design a program for increasing bicycle and pedestrian access to the transit station, including both design improvements and education/promotion efforts. For physical improvements, include both the immediate vicinity, as well as connections to origins that lie in the catchment area.

Alternate Exercise
Choose a nearby transit stop or park-n-ride station and ride a bike or walk to it. Document the problems along the way, as well as those you experience when you arrive at the station/stop. Given your knowledge of the community, what would it take to get people to bicycle and walk to this site?

Lesson Objectives:

Lesson Outline:

Why Bicycles Should Be Integrated With Transit:

How Bicycles Should Be Integrated With Transit:

Transit Agency Concerns:

Bicyclist Concerns:

Elements of Successful Bike-Transit Programs:

Lesson Summary:

 

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Page last modified on February 1, 2013.
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