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FHWA Home / Safety / Pedestrian & Bicycle / FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

FHWA Course on Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Course Overview

Course Introduction

Lesson 1: The Need for Bicycle and Pedestrian Mobility

1.1 Purpose
1.2 How Cities Grow: An Historical Perspective
1.3 Modern Suburban Travel
1.4 Benefits of Bicycling and Walking
1.5 Government Commitment and Support
1.6 Public Support for Bicycling and Walking
1.7 Transportation and Planning Trends
1.8 Exercise: Pictorial Essay
1.9 References

Lesson 2: Bicycling and Walking in the United States Today

2.1 Purpose
2.2 Current Levels of Bicycling and Walking
2.3 Factors Influencing the Decision to Bicycle or Walk
2.4 Potential for Increasing Bicycling and Walking
2.5 Need for Action: Pedestrians and Bicyclists at Risk
2.6 References

Planning Section

Lesson 3: Bicycle and Pedestrian Planning Overview

3.1 Purpose
3.2 Federal Requirements for Planning
3.3 Preparing Local Pedestrian Plans
3.4 Local Bicycle Planning.
3.5 Using Analytical Tools in the Planning Process
3.6 Mapping
3.7 References

Lesson 4: Pedestrian and Bicycle Crash Types

4.1 Purpose
4.2 What is Crash?
4.3 The Crash Avoidance Process
4.4 Number of Bicycle and Pedestrian Crashes
4.5 Summary of Bicycle and Pedestrian Crash Characteristics
4.6 Common Pedestrian and Bicycle Crash Types
4.7 Exercise: Design a Countermeasures Program
4.8 References

Lesson 5: Adapting Suburban Communities for Bicycle and Pedestrian Travel

5.1 Purpose
5.2 Introduction
5.3 Users
5.4 Strategy
5.5 Present Suburban Land Uses
5.6 Safety Problems
5.7 Planning With the Car in Mind
5.8 Planning for Pedestrian and Bicycle Routes
5.9 Existing Retail/Office Developments
5.10 Exercise
5.11 References

Lesson 6: Neo-Traditional Neighborhood Design

6.1 Purpose
6.2 "Putting Brakes on Suburban Sprawl"
6.3 Street Design for Neo-Traditional Neighborhoods
6.4 References

Lesson 7: Using Land-Use Regulations to Encourage Non-Motorized Travel

7.1 Purpose
7.2 Pedestrian-Oriented Land Use
7.3 Commercial Development Design Guidance
7.4 Guidance on Designing Residential Communities That Encourage Walking
7.5 Street Design Standards
7.6 References

Design Issues Common to Bicycles and Pedestrians

Lesson 8: Tort Liability and Risk Management

8.1 Purpose
8.2 Introduction
8.3 Liability - An Issue of Increasing Importance
8.4 Some Basic Definitions.
8.5 Identifying Your Level of Exposure
8.6 Cases That Lead to Quick Settlement Against Government
8.7 References

Lesson 9: Bicycle and Pedestrian Connections to Transit

9.1 Purpose
9.2 Introduction
9.3 Overview of the Problem
9.4 Pedestrian and Pedestrian Transit
9.5 How Are Bicycles Being Integrated With Transit?
9.6 Bike-on-Bus Programs.
9.7 Bike-on-Rail Programs
9.8 Bicycle Parking Facilities at Transit Stations
9.9 Access to Transit Centers
9.10 Why Link Bicyclists With Transit Services?
9.11 What Are Key Elements of Successful Programs?
9.12 Exercise
9.13 References

Lesson 10: Off-Road Trails

10.1 Purpose
10.2 Multi-Use Trails
10.3 Trail Design Information Resources
10.4 Trail Types
10.5 Rail Trails
10.6 Trail Design Issues.
10.7 References

Lesson 11: Traffic Calming

11.1 Purpose
11.2 Traffic Calming Objectives
11.3 Traffic Calming Issues.
11.4 Traffic Calming Devices
11.5 Exercise
11.6 References

Lesson 12: Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities in Work Zones

12.1 Purpose
12.2 Possible Solutions.
12.3 Implementation Strategies.
12.4 Planning and Design Considerations .
12.5 References

Pedestrian Facility Design

Lesson 13: Walkways,Sidewalks and Public Spaces (PDF, 273 Kb)

13.1 Purpose.
13.2 Basic Urban Sidewalk Requirements
13.3 Street Lighting
13.4 Sidewalk Placement
13.5 Ambiance, Shade and Other Sidewalk Enhancements
13.6 Pedestrian Plazas.
13.7 Exercise: Design a Pedestrian Space
13.8 References

Lesson 14: Pedestrian Signing and Pavement Markings

14.1 Purpose
14.2 Introduction
14.3 Planning and Design Considerations
14.4 Regulatory Signs
14.5 Warning Signs
14.6 Directional Signs
14.7 Pavement Word and Symbol Markings
14.8 Exercise
14.9 References

Lesson 15: Pedestrian Accommodations at Intersections

15.1 Purpose
15.2 Introduction
15.3 Crosswalks
15.4 Curb Bulbs and Curb Radii
15.5 Signal Timing and Push Buttons
15.6 Pedestrian Refuge Islands
15.7 Exercise: Urban Intersections
15.8 References

Lesson 16: Mid-Block Crossings

16.1 Purpose
16.2 Introduction
16.3 Medians and Refuge Islands Powerful Safety Tools
16.4 Advantages of Medians.
16.5 Design Considerations for Medians
16.6 Mid-block Crossings by Roadway Classification
16.7 Mid-block Crossing Design
16.8 Mid-block Signals
16.9 Exercise
16.10 References

Lesson 17: Pedestrians With Disabilities

17.1 Purpose
17.2 Introduction
17.3 The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
17.4 Exercise
17.5 References

Bicycle Facility Design

Lesson 18: Shared Roadways

18.1 Purpose
18.2 Shared Roadways
18.3 Wide Curb Lanes
18.4 Shoulder Bikeways.
18.5 Bike Routes
18.6 Bicycle Boulevards
18.7 Practices to be Avoided
18.8 Other Design Considerations
18.9 Exercise
18.10 References

Lesson 19: Bike Lanes

19.1 Purpose
19.2 Bike Lane Widths and Construction Standards
19.3 Unmarked Lanes
19.4 Location Within the Street Cross-Section
19.5 Practices to be Avoided
19.6 Contra-Flow Lanes.
19.7 Bike Lane Pavement Markings
19.8 Bike Lane Signing.
19.9 Diagonal Parking
19.10 Bike Lane Design at Intersections
19.11 Exercise
19.12 References

Lesson 20: Restriping Existing Roads With Bike Lanes

20.1 Purpose
20.2 Introduction
20.3 Reduce Travel-Lane Widths
20.4 Reduce Number of Travel Lanes
20.5 Reconsider the Need for Parking
20.6 Other Considerations.
20.7 Additional Benefits
20.8 Bike Lane Widths.
20.9 Retrofitting Bicycle Lanes While Mitigating On-Street Parking Demand
20.10 Exercise
20.11 References

Lesson 21: Bicycle Facility Maintenance

21.1 Purpose
21.2 Solution Overview
21.3 Objectives
21.4 Implementation Strategies
21.5 Subtasks
21.6 Resource Requirements
21.7 Schedule
21.8 Specifications
21.9 References

Lesson 22: Bicycle Parking and Storage

22.1 Purpose
22.2 Problem Overview.
22.3 Solution Overview
22.4 Objectives
22.5 Implementation Strategies
22.6 Subtasks
22.7 Resource Requirements
22.8 Schedule
22.9 Specifications
22.10 Sample Bike Parking Ordinance From Madison, WI
22.11 References

Lesson 23: European Approaches to Bicycle and Pedestrian Facility Design

23.1 Purpose
23.2 Pedestrian Facilities
23.3 Bicycle Facilities
23.4 References

Lesson 24: Education,Encouragement, and Enforcement

24.1 Purpose
24.2 Comprehensive Programs - Why They're Important
24.3 Successfully Mixing the 4-E's
24.4 Elements of Good Education Program
24.5 Elements of Good Enforcement Program
24.6 Elements of Good Encouragement Program
24.7 Conclusion
24.8 References

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Page last modified on February 1, 2013.
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